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PAGANISM

Astral Worship
Dialogues_Concerning_Natural_Religions_Thumbnail
Lectures_on_the_Origin_and_Growth_of_Religion_as_Illustrated_by_the_Native_Religions_of_Mexico_and_Peru
Myths of the Norsemen
Pagan and Christian Creeds
Pagan and Christian Rome
Pantheism,_Its_Story_and_Significance
Religion and Art in Ancient Greece
Religions of Ancient China
Rig Veda Americanus
The Antichrist
The Belief in Immorality and the Worship of the Dead
The Children of Odin
The Edda, Volume 1
The Edda Volume 2
The Fairy-Faith in Celtic Countries
The Mide wiwin or Grand Medicine Society of the Ojibwa
The_Mountain_Chant,_A_Navajo_Ceremony
The pagan tribes of Borneo
The Religion of Ancient Rome
The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria
The Religion of Numa
The Religion of the Ancient Celts
The Tao Teh King, or the Tao and its Characteristics
The Witch-cult in Western Europe
Unwritten Literature of HawaiI

NEWLY ADDED BOOKS

Morals and Dogma by Albert Pike

First reported from 1872 to 1969, “Morals and Dogma” is one of the most intelligent pieces usually assembled for Freemasonry. It is a compilation of thirty-two articles which produce an explanation for the Scottish Rite degrees. It involves a review of Freemasonry, sane thought, antique questions, tradition, custom, and ritual. It serves the practical purpose of giving Masonic philosophy and virtues within the situation of the public, and wishes fellow to figure out great to cast aside the minor interests of ordinary living and to develop ourselves.

Morals and Dogma by Albert Pike
Dogma Et Rituel De La Haute Magie Part I

The piece has recently appealed to the attention of scholars for its judges on the study of magic, religion, natural science and alchemy. Lévi sees magic in between science and religion and views it serves a potential conciliatory or mediating function between the two views. Lévi rejects views, such as E. B. Taylor’s, that magic or religion is inherently irrational and has been superseded by modern science. Instead he posits magic as an “esoteric science” and suggests that Hermeticism could be adapted to find the underlying truth behind all magical systems, calling for a “comparative magic.” Levi thus posits a type of Perennialism buttressed by comparative theology and comparative religion, anticipating modern-day religious studies and paralleling contemporary comparative projects in anthropology and philology such as the work of Max Müller.

Dogma Et Rituel De La Haute Magie Part I
Dogma Et Rituel De La Haute Magie Part II

The piece has recently appealed to the attention of scholars for its judges on the study of magic, religion, natural science and alchemy. Lévi sees magic in between science and religion and views it serves a potential conciliatory or mediating function between the two views. Lévi rejects views, such as E. B. Taylor’s, that magic or religion is inherently irrational and has been superseded by modern science. Instead he posits magic as an “esoteric science” and suggests that Hermeticism could be adapted to find the underlying truth behind all magical systems, calling for a “comparative magic.” Levi thus posits a type of Perennialism buttressed by comparative theology and comparative religion, anticipating modern-day religious studies and paralleling contemporary comparative projects in anthropology and philology such as the work of Max Müller.

Dogma Et Rituel De La Haute Magie Part II
The Religions of Ancient Egypt and Babylonia

The Religions of Ancient Egypt and Babylonia are not a precise statement of the relation of these ( ancient ) religions. Slightly, it is an experiment of the statistics of those religions as previously started out through a (where feasible) precise classical research, in place to determine how their opinions support for or against some of the spiritual ideas and forms of our current lives. They shared the printed activity into two parts negotiating with ‘the religion of ancient Egypt’ in Separate I and ‘the religion of the Babylonians’ in Separate II.

The Religions of Ancient Egypt and Babylonia (1)
The Religious Quest of the Graeco-Roman World

An account of how Graeco-Roman religion set the execution for Christianity in Europe, examining numerous Greco-Roman notions such as mysticism, redemption, gnosticism, and sacraments.

“From ancient records, Dr. Angus reconstructs a vivid picture of that magnificent civilization contemporaneous with the founding of the Christian church, with the result that a more significant conception of the faith we know today emerges from his study of the rich intellectual and spiritual currents of the pagan world as they aided or opposed or modified the struggling young religion from the East.”--Publisher’s note.

The Religious Quests of the Graeco-Roman World
Astral Worship

This book explains in detail the votaries of the ancient Astral worship divided into two distinct classes, the Esoterics, or Gnostics; and the Exoterics, or Agnostics; the former comprising those who knew that the Gods were mythical and the scriptures allegorical; and the latter, those who were taught that the Gods were real, and the scriptures historical; or, in other words, it was philosophy for the cultured few, and religion for the ignorant multitude. The initiates into the secrets of these two systems recognized them as the two Gospels; and Paul must have had reference to them in his Epistle to the Galatians ii., 2, where he distinguishes the Gospel which he preached on ordinary occasions from that Gospel which he preached “privately to them which were of reputation.”

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Astral Worship

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Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion

Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion is a philosophical work by the Scottish philosopher David Hume, first published in 1779. Through dialogue, three philosophers named Demea, Philo, and Cleanthes debate the nature of God’s existence. Whether these names reference specific philosophers, ancient or otherwise, remains a topic of scholarly dispute. While all three agree that a god exists, they differ sharply in opinion on God’s nature or attributes and how, or if, humankind can come to know of a deity.

Hume started writing the Dialogues in 1750 but did not complete them until 1776, shortly before his death. Based partly on Cicero’s De Natura Deorum. The Dialogues got published posthumously in 1779, originally with neither the author’s nor the publisher’s name.

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Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion

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Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion as Illustrated by the Native Religions of Mexico and Peru

It will be my task to-day to recount the Mexican mythology and religion, resting as it does on the foundation common to the peoples of Central America, but inspired by the sombre, utilitarian, matter-of-fact, yet vigorous and earnest, genius of the Aztecs. You remember that this name belongs to the warlike and commercial people that enjoyed, at the beginning of the sixteenth century, a military and political supremacy in the region that is now called Mexico, after the Aztec capital of that name.

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Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion

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Myths of the Norsemen

Over the centuries, Northern mythology has exerted much influence on Western customs, language, and literature. Its principal theme of the perpetual struggle of the beneficent forces of nature against the injurious, and its twin characteristics of dark tragedy and grim humor, tinge much European literature and music, most notably Wagner’s Ring Cycle.

In this volume, a noted scholar of myth and folklore has assembled a rich collection of Northern mythology as preserved in the Eddas and sagas of Iceland. These are perhaps the purest versions of the original myths, thanks to the island’s remoteness and lack of contact with outside influences. Both grand and tragical, the age-old tales tell of the creation of the world; the heroic deeds of such gods and heroes as Odin, Thor, and Siegfried; the machinations of the evil Loki; the fantastical adventures of giants, dwarfs, and elves; the twilight of the gods; and much else. Sixty-four marvelous, atmospheric illustrations add an additional dimension of charm.

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Myths of the Norsemen

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Pagan and Christian Creeds

The author discusses the Pagan and the Christian creeds from a broad anthropological standpoint and in a spirit free from criticism and the limitations of dogmatism. He dilates at considerable length on the similarities shown by the several religions, especially the similarities between pagan religions and the Christian religion, and reaches the conclusion that such similarities can only be explained on the assumption that religions are of psychological origin. That is, mankind in response to similar needs and with similar mental machinery has evolved similar types of response.

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Pagan and Christian Creeds

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Pagan and Christian Rome

There is so much yet to learn about the relative interconnection between pagan and early Christian beliefs, especially during their first manifestations in Ancient Rome. Theoretically, according to the Christian Bible, Christ did not set out to create a religion of his own, rather to reform the corruption that was spreading through certain sects of the Jewish faith. Chronologically, Christianity practiced in the earliest forms with a certain tide over of early Jewish and Roman roots, and a healthy dose of Northern influence from the Gauls and the Saxons as invading tribes brought new influences to Rome. This book is very interesting, despite its age, as the author backtracks to several moments in history where pagans and Christians co-existed in Rome, eventually taking and grafting pieces of each other to incorporate extra elements of worship still practiced.

Pagan and Christian Rome by Rodolfo Amedeo Lanciani is a thorough and informative account of the subject. The author has written about the Pagan shrines and temples, the christian churches, the Imperial Tombs and the Papal Tombs. The author has explained the history and details about the above in great detail, which is very enriching.

Pagan and Christian Rome

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Pantheism, Its Story and Significance

Pantheism, being a term derived from two Greek words signifying “all” and “God,” suggests to a certain extent its own meaning. Thus, if Atheism be taken to mean a denial of the being of God, Pantheism is its extreme opposite; because Pantheism declares that there is nothing but God. This, however, needs explanation. For no Pantheist has ever held God is all. That everything is God, any more than a teacher of physiology, in enforcing on his students the unity of the human organism, would insist that every toe and finger is the man. But such a teacher, at least in But not Everything Is God.

Pantheism,_Its_Story_and_Significance

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Religion and Art in Ancient Greece

This book is worth reading and presents the growth of belief in the Gods of ancient Greece, along with the artistic depiction in each age. The particular fail within the text is a clear insinuation that idolatry brought in about the death of the GODS of ANCIENT GREECE. The Christian sect is the culprit for this destruction effort. Christianity failed to wipe out the religion of ancient Greece. It has survived through the art and expertise of many artists and authors. Hellenism is rousing from the essential facts of beauty and ideology which Christianity has never admired.

From the Preface: Greek religion may be studied under various aspects; and many recent contributions to this study have been mainly concerned either with the remote origin of many of its ceremonies in primitive ritual, or with the manner in which some of its obscurer manifestations met the deeper spiritual needs which did not find satisfaction in the official cults. Such discussions are of the highest interest to the anthropologist and to the psychologist; but they have the disadvantage of fixing our attention too exclusively on what, to the ordinary Greek, appeared accidental or even morbid, and of making us regard the Olympian pantheon, with its clearly realised figures of the gods, as a mere system imposed more or less from outside upon the old rites and beliefs of the people. In the province of art, at least, the Olympian gods are paramount; and thus we are led to appreciate and to understand their worship as it affected the religious ideals of the people and the services of the State. For we must remember that in the case of religion even more than in that of art, its essential character and its influence upon life and thought lie rather in its full perfection than in its origin.

Religion and Art in Ancient Greece

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Religion of Ancient China

The ancient Chinese are said to have three doctrines: Confucianism, Buddhism, and Taoism, with Christianity and Islam arriving only in the 7th century A.D. Laozi, according to tradition, was the 6th century B.C. Chinese philosopher who wrote the Tao Te Ching of Taoism. Confucius (551-479) taught morality. His philosophy became important during the Han Dynasty (206 B.C.-A.D.220). Herbert A Giles (1845-1935), a British Sinologist who modified the Roman version of Chinese characters, says although it is often counted as a religion of China, Confucianism is not a religion, but a system of social and political morality. The Indian emperor Ashoka sent Buddhist missionaries to China in the third century.

Religions of Ancient China

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Rig Veda Americanus

In accordance with the general object of this series of volumes—which is to furnish materials for study rather than to offer completed studies—I have prepared for this number the text of the most ancient authentic record of American religious lore. From its antiquity and character, I have ventured to call this paltry collection the Rig Veda Americanus, after the similar cyclus of sacred hymns, which are the most venerable product of the Aryan mind.

Rig Veda Americanus new

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