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The Story of a Soul

The Story of a Soul

Life Lessons from St. Thérèse Of Lisieux

The Story of a Soul

The Story of a Soul conveys St. Thérèse of Lisieux’s “Little Way” of spiritual childhood – her “elevator” to Heaven, as she called it. Pope Pius XI approved this method as a way for all to grow in holiness through unfailing confidence and childlike delight in God’s merciful love. In this book, St. Thérèse shows us how her “Little Way” of love and trust comes straight from Sacred Scripture. Pope St Pius X called St. Thérèse of Lisieux the “greatest Saint of modern times and said that this book should be in every Catholic home”. From the very beginning of Story of a Soul, we learn that Therese’s life as a child had great suffering. She faced trials such as the death of a family member, life-threatening illness, and struggling to find the path that God had planned for her life.  Her life was filled with hardships and tears, it’s what she did in the aftermath of despair that made her truly great. It can be extremely difficult to continue to push forward when feeling lost, confused, and even angry. In our darkest moments, and also with the stress of daily life, love can be hard to uphold. St. Therese realized this and understood what a daunting task vowing to do everything in love could be. Yet, when she confronted sickness with no cure: she still showed love.

How do we experience joy during the toughest moments of our lives? Therese only lived to be 24, and constant suffering scarred her life. Her mother died of cancer when she was four, and her sister and best friend Pauline abandoned her for the Carmel a few years later. Then, at the end of her life, tuberculosis ravaged both her body and soul. The crippling disease caused her so much pain that it caused her to question her faith in a period she called the darkest of her life.

Thérèse looked at the challenges she faced as an opportunity from God. It was a chance to love, unconditionally, as Jesus loves. So, for us, we need to embrace the daily challenges that come our way.

St. Thérèse Of Lisieux

God doesn’t give them to us as punishment or because He thinks we deserve it. Instead, the tough days should bring us closer to Him. Challenge yourself and live outside of comfort, because otherwise how can we grow? And neither should we.
Thérèse embraced all her struggles with an incredible resilience. She welcomed her deathbed with more faith and love of Christ than she ever had. Better than anything else, she understood Christ’s sacrifice on the cross and what it meant for us. Thérèse had made it a point to be Christlike in every other aspect of life, and to her there was no more noble ideal than suffering as Christ suffered. Thérèse bore the crosses and didn’t put them down.


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The Story of a Soul

The Story of a Soul

Biography St. Thérèse Of Lisieux

St Therese of Lisieux


“Miss no single opportunity of making some small sacrifice, here by a smiling look, there by a kindly word; always doing the smallest right and doing it all for love.”


St. Thérèse of Lisieux, also called St. Teresa of the Child Jesus or the Little Flower, original name Marie-Françoise-Thérèse Martin, was born on January 2, 1873, in Alencon, France and died on September 30, 1897, at Lisieux. They canonized her on May 17, 1925; feast day October 1, Carmelite nun whose service to the Roman Catholic order was recognized for its exemplary spiritual accomplishments. Pope John Paul II named her a Doctor of the Church in 1997. Thérèse was the youngest of nine children, five of whom survived childhood.
After her mother died of breast cancer in 1877, Thérèse moved with her family to Lisieux. Her piety developed early in the deeply religious atmosphere of her home. All four of her elder sisters became nuns, and at 15 she entered the Carmelite convent at Lisieux. Although she suffered from depression, scruples—a causeless feeling of guilt—and, at the end, religious doubts, she kept the rule to perfection and maintained a smiling, pleasant, and unselfish manner. Before her death from tuberculosis, she acknowledged that, because of her arduous nature, not one day had ever passed without a struggle. Her burial site at Lisieux became a place of pilgrimage, and they built a basilica bearing her name there (1929–54).
The story of Thérèse’s spiritual development turned into a collection of her epistolary essays, written by order of the prioresses and published in 1898 under the title Histoire d’une âme (“Story of a Soul”). Her popularity results from this work, which conveys her loving pursuit of holiness in ordinary life.

The Story of a Soul

St. Therese defined her doctrine of the Little Way as “the way of spiritual childhood, the way of trust and absolute surrender.” In 1925 Pope Pius XI canonized her making Therese the youngest person designated a Doctor of the Church.
In 2015 Pope Francis I canonized Thérèse’s parents, Saint Louis Martin and Marie-Azélie Guérin, making them the first spouses canonized together.


  • Story of a Soul by St. Thérèse Of Lisieux
  • Letters to Celine by St. Thérèse Of Lisieux
  • Prayers by St. Thérèse Of Lisieux
  • Counsels at Reminiscences by St. Thérèse Of Lisieux

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AHC

Chag Matzot

Chag Matzot

Festival of Unleavened Bread

Chag Matzot is a 7-day long festival that occurs in the Spring. It starts on the evening of the 14th day of Chodesh Rishon (First New Moon), the first month, and ends on the 21st day. It is a moment of birth and newness, a time to rise up. The first day of the Festival of Matzot is a holy set-apart day called the Pesach festival.
The first and last day of the festival are celebrated as holy days with special meals, special prayers services and abstention from all servile work. Pesach is a festival to commemorate the Hebrew people’s emancipation from slavery in Mitsrayim, the time when they rose up against Pharaoh. The scriptural account describes the Hebrew people as they fled Mitsrayim with such urgency they could not wait for their bread dough to rise; when it was baked later, it was matzo (unleavened) and as they traveled through the desert, they had nothing to eat but matzo bread. The Festival of Matzot is one of the 3 scripturally ordained Pilgrimage Festivals.
Matzo is defined as unleavened flat bread. The plural of Matzo is Matzot. Matzo bread consists of only water and flour, with no yeast, shortening, or other enriching agents. Matzah recreates the hard “bread of affliction” provided to the Hebrew slaves by their ruthless masters. Like the bitter herbs used to season the Pesach animal, it represents the suffering and degradation of the people of Yisrael. Matzah was the hard slave bread; we eat it instead of the rich, soft bread that was eaten by free people.

Yeast

The Scriptures often use “yeast” or “leaven” to symbolize sin. In cleaning it out of our homes, we realize how difficult it is to find and remove all of it. When we see how difficult it is to remove the leaven out of our homes, we realize just how difficult it is to get the sin out of our lives. In the same way, it’s easier to get the big, obvious sins out of our lives, but more difficult to get the hidden, seemingly small ones out before they rise up.


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Blogs

The Story of the Book of Mormon

The Story of the Book of Mormon

Book of Mormon


First Council of the Seventy

  • George Reynolds was born on January 1, 1842, In Marylebone, London, United Kingdom and died on August 9, 1909, in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States because of meningitis.
  • His father was George Reynolds and his mother was Julia A. Tautz.
  • He was under the care of his maternal grandmother, Sarah White, during his childhood who occupied as a servant and also was an influencer to Reynolds to go to a gathering of Latter-Day-Saints church with her.
  • He attended a sacrament meeting of the church’s Paddington Branch with his grandmother, and almost immediately decided that he wanted to become a member.
  • In any case, his parents rejected to allow him to be baptized as a member of the church. Often, he would avoid his parents’ choices and attend the Sunday meetings in Paddington. When Reynolds was 14 years old, he visited the church’s Somers Town Branch, where he was unfamiliar, and requested acceptance into the church by baptism. Not realizing that his parents had forbidden the action. The branch president, George Teasdale, baptized him on May 4, 1856, and he was confirmed as a member of the church on May 11, 1856.
  • He wedded his third and last wife, named Mary Goold on April 25, 1885. But like many early Latter-Day Saints, he practiced the religious principle of plural marriage. He had 3 wives and 32 children. One of his daughters wedded Joseph Fielding Smith.
  • He had been jailed In Utah since the Utah Supreme Court confirmed his second conviction in June 1876. After his failed appeal to the Supreme Court, they transferred him from a jail in Utah to the Nebraska State Penitentiary in Lincoln, where he became U.S. Prisoner Number 14 and was assigned to be the bookkeeper in the knitting department. He hardly survived In the Nebraska prison for 25 days, after which they transferred him to the Utah Territory Penitentiary, where regulations were more primitive and vermin more abundant. He reported the detainees could not have a fire for fear that the jail would burn down. On many wintry mornings, he would awaken and his beard would be one solid mass of ice. They released him from jail on January 20, 1881, having served his full sentence, less than 5 months for moral behavior. U.S. President Grover Cleveland absolved him in 1894.
  • He continued his position as secretary to the First Presidency after being imprisoned. He also became an active organizer within the Deseret Sunday School Union (DSSU), serving as the editor and writing many articles for its publication, the Juvenile Instructor. Reynolds was an early or second assistant to three general superintendents of the DSSU from 1899 until his death in 1909. He was the second assistant to George Q. Cannon from 1899 to 1901; he became the first assistant to Lorenzo Snow In 1901, and he was also the first assistant to Joseph F. Smith from 1901 until 1909.

Published Works

  • Reynolds, George (1879). The Book of Abraham: Its Authenticity Established as a Divine and Ancient Record: With Copious References to Ancient and Modern Authorities. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret New Printing & Publishing.
  • (1888). The Story of the Book of Mormon. Salt Lake City, Utah: Jos. Hyrum Parry.
  • (1900). A Complete Concordance to the Book of Mormon. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book.
  • (1891). A Dictionary of the Book of Mormon: Comprising Its Biographical, Geographical and Other Proper Names. Salt Lake City, Utah: Jos. Hyrum Parry.
  • (1882). “Internal Evidences of the Book of Mormon: Showing the Absurdity of the ‘Spalding Story'”. Juvenile instructor. LDS Church. 17 (15-16): 235-38, 251-52. Retrieved 2007-04-05.
  • (1882). “The Book of Mormon and the Three Witnesses”. Juvenile Instructor. LDS Church. 17 (18): 281. Retrieved 2007-04-05.
  • (1882). “Time Occupied in Translating the Book of Mormon”. Juvenile Instructor. LDS Church. 17 (20): 315-317. Retrieved 2007.04-05

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Blogs

The Renascence of Hebrew Literature

The Renascence of Hebrew Literature

The Revival of Hebrew

Initially published in French in 1903 as the Nahum Slouschz’s doctorate thesis at the University of Paris, this book explores the resurrection of Hebrew as a literary language and presents an analysis of the literature it has contributed, by a “grievous spectacle of poets and writers who are constantly expressing their anxiety lest it disappear within them.” European in extent and encapsulating all the passion and discord of the writings of a nation trying to find its voice, this is a compassionate and encouraging work, one that anyone will find practical and entertaining.
The evolution from Medieval Hebrew to Israeli or Modern Hebrew developed over many years. Many scholars tell us that the language began to change by the early 16th century. Amongst the first appearances were the first Yiddish‑Hebrew dictionary by Elijah Levita (1468‑1549), A. dei Rossi’s Me’or Einayim (1574) and the first Hebrew play by J. Sommo (1527‑92). They adapted Hebrew to modern needs, and it remains in use in writing today.


The Haskalah (Jewish Enlightenment)

The first Hebrew newspapers appeared in the 18th century. I. Lampronti (1679‑1756) at Ferrara and, from 1750, M. Mendelssohn at Dessau were the forerunners. A periodical, Ha‑Me’assef, ran quarterly from 1784 to 1829. The “Society of Friends of the Hebrew Language” edited it, and it contained many writings from prominent leaders of the Haskalah (Jewish Enlightenment) movement. In 1856 they printed the first weekly newspaper, Ha‑Maggid, in Russia. The leaders of the Jewish Enlightenment sought to revive Hebrew as a thriving language, by working to purify the language and advocating its correct use.

They likewise strengthened its capacity for communicating by borrowing and translating words from German and other Western languages. Many of the group’s leaders wanted to preserve Rabbinic Hebrew as an authentic element of the modernized language, but the bulk of them agreed to adopt the unadulterated form of Biblical Hebrew for verse and on an Andalusian style for writing instead. The Andalusian style is comparable to that practiced in the 12th and 13th centuries by the well-known family of Jewish translators, the Ibn Tibbons.
Many writers in the latter part of the 19th century paved the way for modern Hebrew; especially the playwright D. Zamoscz, who composed the first contemporary play in 1851, and novelist like A. Mapu who wrote the first book in this new style, and Yiddish linguists such as S.J. Abramowitsch.
Many of the 19th‑century authors sought to adopt a biblical form of the language and usually established a framework contradictory to its essence and that typically contained many grammatical errors. Mendele, who penned in both Hebrew and Yiddish, adopted into his terminology from various sources, including Biblical Hebrew and Yiddish. He along with many other writers made significant strides towards making sure that Hebrew would again become a spoken language.

Hebrew in Palestine (Pre-State Israel)

The printing of Eliezer Ben-Yehuda’s editorial titled “A burning question” in 1879 spawned a new generation of the Hebrew language. It made spoken Hebrew one of the most significant facets of the new settlement in Palestine.

Many Palestinian Jews already used Hebrew as a language spoken by individuals who had differing primary languages. However; Hebrew was never implemented universally, and the different emigrant communities persisted in speaking their primary languages. A primary element that helped Ben‑Yehuda to reestablish the Hebrew language was the absence of an existing nationalized language in the country, an eagerness by eastern and central European Jews to restore their culture, and remembrances of the ancient nobility that the Jews had previously experienced in Palestine. While in Jerusalem in 1881, Ben‑Yehuda moved forward with his aspiration of transforming Hebrew into a language fit for everyday practice. Ben-Yehuda set out to advance a fitting terminology, in which he blended words from archaic and out-of-date literature to form original words incorporated into his Thesaurus. Ben‑Yehuda describes the processes utilized for tailoring the language daily use in his Thesaurus.
The biggest hindrance to establishing Hebrew as a widespread language was the origination of new words. Therefore, discovering new words became the primary task of Ben‑Yehuda and the Language Council. Mechanisms established to adapt Hebrew for everyday practice include the addition of words taken from Arabic, based on their linguistic closeness to Hebrew, and a return to the scientific and specialized Hebrew terminology of the Ibn Tibbons translations. Ben‑Yehuda adopted many effective Hebrew and Aramaic phrases, and Latin and Greek loanwords, from the Talmud and the Mishnah.
They applied Aramaic linguistic patterns and suffixes for infrequently used biblical words, and root words confirmed in Biblical Hebrew were manipulated to extract new words conforming to their historic morphological forms.


Nahum Slouschz

  • Nahum Slouschz was born on November 1872 in Smarhon, Vilna district, Byelorussia and died in Tel Aviv, Israel on December 23, 1966. Slouschz was a Russian-born Israeli archaeologist, writer and linguist recognized for his research of the “secret” Hebrew communities in North Africa, particularly, Ethiopia, South Africa, Tunisia and Libya, but also in many secluded territories of Africa, and also in Portugal.
  • When he was 10 years old, the family moved to Odessa where his father, R. Dovid-Shloyme, became the rabbi at a temple on the outskirts of Moldavanka. Besides being a rabbi, Nahum’s father was a member of the Lovers of Zion and a Hebrew writer. 
  •  Nahum frequently studied the Talmud and the Tanakh with his father, in addition to learning foreign languages and worldly studies from his private tutors.
  • At nineteen, the Hovevei Zion Society of Odessa sent him to Palestine to research the possibility of settling a territory in the Holy Land. He was not unsuccessful and returned home, but did return to Palestine in 1919 and became a permanent resident of the country. In 1896 he traveled to Austria and Lithuania and Egypt before going back to Palestine.
  • Slouschz graduated from the Rabbinical Seminary in Odessa, and afterward taught Hebrew literature at Sorbonne University in Paris, and then in America. He was an associate of Theodor Herzl, the founder of the Zionist Organization, and was known as the father of the State of Israel. Slouschz headed archeological expeditions in Tiberias and Jerusalem.
  • He studied philosophy and belles-lettres at the University of Geneva in 1898. During this period, Nahum assisted in the set-up of the Swiss Federation of Zionists. He travelled to Paris in 1900, where he learned Oriental languages. He worked as a journalist at several newspapers, including Ha-Melitz and Ha-Tsefirah. In 1902, he taught school in Auteuil. In 1903, he finished his doctorate at the University of Paris and wrote his thesis on the topic of the renaissance of Hebrew literature. His thesis was initially published in French and a later revision in Hebrew under the title “Korot ha-Sifrut ha-Ìvrit ha-Hadasha.” The English version was released in 1909 incorporating new material, and was published under the title The Renascence of Hebrew Literature (1743-1885). In 1904, he taught on Neo-Hebraic composition at the University of Paris.

Publicated Wroks

  • Among his best works were books entitled “Across Unknown Jewish Africa,” and “The Renaissance of Hebrew Literature.”
  • His first article was written in 1887 called Haeshkol (The Cluster), and he later wrote articles for: Hamelits (The Advocate), Hatsfira (The Siren), Hapisga (The summit), Haḥavatselet (The Daffodil), and Voskhod (Sunrise), among others.  At that time, he published in book form: Kat hamityahadim berusya (A group of converts to Judaism in Russia) (Vienna, 1889); Ma yaase haadam velo yeḥele (What a person needs to do so as not to get sick) (Jerusalem, 1891), 46 pp.; Haosher meain yimatse (Where is happiness to be found?) (Jerusalem, 1894); and Mnemotekhnik (The art of memory), in Russian.
  • In 1903 he obtained his doctoral degree for his treatise, La Renaissance de la littérature hébraique, 1734-1885, and it was later published in book form in French (Paris, 1903) and in Hebrew as Korot hasifrut haivrit haḥadasha (Warsaw, 1906), and in English as Renascence of Hebrew Literature (1909).

Awards

  • Nahum Slouschz won the Bialik Prize for Jewish thought in 1942. The Bialik Prize is a yearly literary award presented by the city of Tel Aviv, for notable achievements in Hebrew literature.

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Blogs

The Life of Flavius Josephus

The Life of Flavius Josephus

Yosef ben Matityahu


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Blogs

The Jesus of History

The Jesus of History

Why Care about the Historical Jesus


Terrot Reaveley Glover

Classical Scholar and Historian
  • Terrot Reaveley Glover (T.S. Glover), classical scholar and historian, was born in Cotham, Bristol, United Kingdom on July 23, 1869.
  • He attended Bristol Grammar School before entering St John’s College, Cambridge, in 1888, where he became a Fellow in 1892.
  • They appointed him Professor of Latin at Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, in 1896. Glover returned to Cambridge in 1901 as a teaching fellow at St John’s, and was a university lecturer in ancient history, 1911-1939, and orator, 1920-1939.
  • He died in Cambridge on 26 May 1943. Glover worked as a lecturer for 20 years, and wrote several well-known books, including The Jesus of History, Poets and Puritans and The Conflict of Religions in the Early Roman Empire.

Quotes by T. R. Glover


“The kind Apollo (ho phílos),” he says, “seems to heal the questions of life, and to resolve them, by the rules he gives to those who ask; but the questions of thought he himself suggests to the philosophic temperament, waking in the soul an appetite that will lead it to truth.” ― T.R. Glover, The Conflict of Religions in the Early Roman Empire



“The eunuch priests of Cybele and the monks of Serapis introduced a new abstinence to Western thought. It is significant that Christian monasticism and the coenobite life began in Egypt, where, as we learn from papyri found in recent years, great monasteries of Serapis existed long before our era. Side by side with celibacy came vegetarianism. No” ― T.R. Glover, The Conflict of Religions in the Early Roman Empire



Works by T. R. Glover

  • Studies in Virgil (1904)
  • The Conflict of Religions in the Early Roman Empire (1909) 
  • Poets and Puritans (1916)
  • From Pericles to Philip (1917)
  • Jesus in the Experience of Men (1921)
  • The Pilgrim: Essays on Religion (1921)
  • Progress in Religion to the Christian Era (1922)
  • The Jesus of History (1922)
  • The Nature and Purpose of a Christian Society (1922)
  • Herodotus (1924)
  • Apology: De Spectaculis (With Felix M. Minucius) (1931)
  • Democracy and Religion (1932)
  • The Ancient World: A Beginning (1935)

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